Workshop

Saturday 07 April, GSQ, 25 Stackpole Street, Wishart, 9am-12pm

Many of us think that our family stories will only be read by us and interested family members.  So referencing where we find our information is often the last thing on our mind. However, your research may be used to help others further on down the track — perhaps even 30 years later — but to be a valuable source, you need to list where you found your information. Even if you just include the web sites you used or books you read, there will be a grateful reader who may be able to add to your list or find something that will lead to new insight on their branch of the family.

This is a very practical workshop. There will be three short presentations, each of which will give an overview of aspects of referencing and citation. Participants will then practise the referencing of their work, using their own family stories.  Attendees may bring their own laptop or use the computers at GSQ.

Sharyn Merkley
Sharyn will discuss how your audience can influence the number of references and their level of detail that may be included in family stories.  She will use her latest book, Brisbane Burns, as an example of a book which is not fully referenced and the reasons behind that decision. Other topics will include keeping track of references and bibliographies during research, unwritten rules and what really matters to the reader.

Janice Wellard
It is important to leave a trail for other researchers to follow and endnotes or footnotes are one way to note the sources you have consulted during your family history research. In this presentation, Janice will discuss how to use endnotes or footnotes in your stories and some of the basic ways to present your sources.

Janice Cooper
Someone once said that a family history without references could be considered a work of fiction. What this means is that if your painstakingly researched book doesn’t cite where you found your information, then it will lack credibility and not provide a trail for others to follow. Does this matter if your publication will be given only to family members? What are the special features of referencing important to family history writing? What other features of your writing, such as indexes and bibliographies, provide a trail for others to follow? This presentation will discuss answers to these questions.  

About the presenters

 

Janice Wellard

Janice has been doing family history research for over 40 years and writing stories about various ancestors for much of this time. She enjoys volunteering at GSQ and helping members research their own ancestors (and others) as well as presenting the regular Introduction to Family History course for GSQ. As Editor of GSQ’s journal Generation, she is very keen to encourage all writers to reference their stories, partly because it can be of benefit to others, giving them ideas and options to further their own research.

 

 

Sharyn Merkley

Sharyn first became interested in her own family history as a teenager listening to her great grandmother’s stories. Since then she has continued to research her own family and that of her husband. In 2012 while hunting the Merkley ancestors she became fascinated by the story of the Great Fire of Brisbane. This led to five years of research and writing delving into the family history of the survivors resulting in the publication Brisbane Burns: How the great fires of 1864 shaped a city and its people.

 

 

Janice Cooper

Janice is an experienced family historian with a primary interest in her Australian ancestry since 1791. She is keen for the excellent research and writing undertaken by family historians to be widely recognised and enhanced. Her publications include articles in general, local and family history magazines and blogs. She is involved in judging family history publications.